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Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood is a classic fairy tale that is known the world over. There are so many wonderful retellings and twists on the original tale. This is a collection of books that feature the classic story, fun twists on the story, the tale told from the wolf’s point of view, and books that are great for older children.

Little Red Riding Hood

by Lari Don, illustrated by Célia Chauffrey

 

Little Red Riding Hood loves to visit her Granny's cottage in the forest. Her mother warns her to go straight to Granny's, but when she meets a handsome grey wolf, she doesn't see the harm in stopping for a chat. Scottish storyteller Lari Don's retelling of this well-loved tale is lively and exciting with a wolf who is just scary enough for younger children to enjoy. Célia Chauffrey's finely detailed paintings create an enticing world of quirky characters in a dark and mysterious forest. Comes with storytime CD featuring narration of the text by beloved English actress Imelda Staunton.

Little Red

by Bethan Woollvin 

 

Little Red Riding Hood meets a wolf on her way through the woods to visit her sick grandmother. The wolf is hungry, and Red Riding Hood looks tasty, so he hatches a dastardly plan, gobbles up Grandma and lies in wait. So far, so familiar. But this Little Red Riding Hood is not easily fooled, and this big bad wolf better watch his back. In this defiant interpretation of the traditional tale, the cheeky, brave little girl seizes control of her own story (and the wolf gets rather more than he bargained for).

Little Red Hood

by  Marjolaine Leray, translated by Sarah Ardizzone

 

She started life as a little red scribble and then, there she was - a little red hood, barely recognisable as the legend from the fairy tale. The wolf is still big and bad, but he also happens to be really, really dumb. Little Red Hood questions the wolf's personal hygiene before tricking her predator into his demise: this is one savvy little red scrawl with her head screwed on. Edgy, stylish and very funny, this book retells the famous story in an unexpected way.

The Wolf's Story

by Toby Forward, illustrated by Izhar Cohen 

 

The real story of Little Red Riding Hood - told by the Wolf himself! Recounted in the confidential, conversational voice of a New York wheeler-dealer, this funny version of the Grimm Brothers' Little Red Riding Hood is retold from a fresh perspective - the Wolf's! Full of humorous revelations and surprises, the story shows, as it unfolds, how a series of misunderstandings and accidents leads to his vilification.

Into the Forest

by Anthony Browne

 

A shortcut through the forest to Grandma's house produces some eerie moments - and some oddly familiar characters - in a strikingly illustrated tale about facing fears. One night a boy is woken by a terrible sound. A storm is breaking, lightning flashing across the sky. In the morning Dad is gone and Mum doesn't seem to know when he'll be back. The next day Mum asks her son to take a cake to his sick grandma. "Don't go into the forest," she warns. "Go the long way round." But, for the first time, the boy chooses to take the path into the forest, where he meets a variety of fairy tale characters.

Pretty Salma: A Little Red Riding Hood Story from Africa

by Niki Daly

 

Pretty Salma tells a very different version of Red Riding Hood that includes items from African life. Salma goes to the market for her Grandmother but is tricked by Mr Dog into giving him all her clothes. Salma then works with her Grandfather to try and stop Mr Dog before he eats Grandma.

Petite Rouge: A Cajun Red Riding Hood

by Mike Artell 

 

When her grand-mere comes down wit' de flu, this Cajun Little Red knows what she has to do. With her witty cat, TeJean, she sets off in a pirogue to bring Grand-mere some gumbo. Who should she meet upon the way, but that big ol' swamp gator, Claude! Mean ol' Claude may want to gobble up Petite Rouge, but she and TeJean have a better idea. Before long, they have Claude running back to the bayou where he belongs!