© 2017 The Literacy Classroom 

Year 1 Recommended Fiction

 

Contemporary Fiction

Beegu

by Alexis Deacon

 

Beegu is not supposed to be on Earth. She is lost. She is a friendly little creature, but the Earth People don't seem very welcoming at all. However, so far she has only met the BIG ones. The little ones are a different matter . 

Funnybones

by Janet Ahlberg

 

In this, the first ever Funnybones book of all, we are introduced to the wonderful humour and fun of the much-loved series. The Funnybones books are a must for children just starting to learn to read - these funny skeletons are definitely not the scary sort!

The Littlest Owl

by Caroline Pitcher and illusrated by Tina Macnaughton

 

Deep inside the willow tree the last baby owl is born. He's so very small, a downy white ball. The other owls grow and learn to fly, but no matter how hard he tries, the littlest owl can't quite do it. 'I will', he says. 'Just you wait and see'. Then one night, a howling storm forces the owls from their home. Will the littlest owl make it to safety?

Dave

by Sue Hendra and illustrated by Liz Pichon

 

Dave is a great big ol’ greedy guts. He loves his dinners. One unfortunate day, after eating a bit too much, he gets stuck in his cat flap. How will he escape? The answer will have you rolling around the floor with laughter.

My Big Brother Boris

by Liz Pichon

 

Little Croc loves his big brother, Boris. But lately Boris has been acting strangely. All he wants to do is eat and sleep and spend time with friends his own age – and he is SO grumpy. A brilliantly funny and reassuring tale about dealing with teenage siblings, written especially for little ones.

Billy Button. Telegram Boy

by Sally Nichols

 

When Charlie the telegram boy breaks his leg and can’t ride his bicycle, Billy Button sees his chance. He has always wanted to be a telegram boy, delivering messages all over the village on the red Post Office bicycle. Soon Billy is zooming about all over the place with news of new babies, sick sisters and sweethearts coming to visit. He even has a chance to put a few things right with a special ‘extra’ telegram or two…High quality cream paper and a special easy to read font ensure a smooth read for all.

Eat Your Peas

by Kes Gray and illusrated by Nick Sharratt

 

Daisy does NOT like peas. And there is NOTHING that will get her to eat them. Mum says she can have an extra pudding, a chocolate factory or a space rocket with double retro laser blammers – but it just won’t work! Can quick-thinking Daisy save her tea time and come up with a cunning plan to turn the tables on Mum?

Mr Wolf's Pancakes

by Jan Fearnley

 

Join Mr Wolf in the kitchen as he gets into trouble while making pancakes! Mr Wolf fancies some tasty pancakes but he doesn’t know how to make them. Asking his neighbours is no use – they’re a mean and horrible lot who refuse to help. Poor Mr Wolf. He has to work it out, all by himself. So what happens when those nasty neighbours want to help Mr Wolf eat his delicious pancakes . . .?

Lost and Found

by Oliver Jeffers

 

A magical tale of friendship and loneliness, a boy and a penguin.

There once was a boy… and one day a penguin arrives on his doorstep. The boy decides the penguin must be lost and tries to return him. But no one seems to be missing a penguin. So the boy decides to take the penguin home himself, and they set out in his row boat on a journey to the South Pole.

But when they get there, the boy discovers that maybe home wasn’t what the penguin was looking for after all…

Dear Greenpeace

by Simon James

 

An unusual and rather lovely picture book, Dear Greenpeace combines delightful, light illustrations with sharp, intelligent text in the form of letters.

Worried that the whale living in her pond is unhappy, Emily embarks on a correspondence with Greenpeace which, despite offering the best of advice, insists that it would be impossible for a whale to live in a pond. Undeterred, young Emily continues to seek the best course of action for her beloved whale, finally setting him free.

Unique, quirky, gentle, warm hearted and thoughtful, Dear Greenpeace is a pleasure to read, and cleverly avoids the trap of being preachy and precious about its subject.

Ernest

by Catherine Rayner

 

Ernest is a rather large moose with a rather large problem. He is so big he can’t fit inside his book! What is a moose to do? Luckily Ernest is also a very determined moose, and he and his little chipmunk friend aren’t going to give up easily. Will they find a way for Ernest to fit in? Featuring a surprise fold-out ending, children will love this very funny book by the Kate Greenaway Medal winning Catherine Rayner.

The Wonder

by Faye Hanson

 

This is a story about a boy whose head is always full of wonder. We follow him on an average-seeming school day, where his daydreams transform the world around him. Unfortunately lots of other people – the park keeper, the bus driver, the lollipop lady – all tell him to get his head out of the clouds. It is only in art class that he realises he can bring the wonder out of his head for the whole world to enjoy.

Can You Catch a Mermaid?

by Jane Ray

 

Have you ever seen a mermaid? Eliza has! And this is the story of how she and a little mermaid became the most inseparable of friends . . .

A perfectly bewitching picture book filled with myth and mystery from the award-winning Jane Ray.

Mr Big

by Ed Vere

 

Mr Big is strong, Mr Big is tough, Mr Big is, well, big! He has just one small problem – because of the way he looks he just can’t get people to stick around. How can he show them that although he may look a little scary, he is just a great big softy inside? With his trademark bold colour and masterful graphic simplicity, Ed Vere sensitively and humorously tackles the universal and current subject of inclusion, reminding the reader that to get to know someone you need to look beyond their exterior.

 

Fairy Tales